10 – 20 – 30

Tim thinks that by tagging me to identify where I was ten, twenty, and thirty years ago, he’ll gain some interesting context to support the reminiscences he’s seen here; I fear that my answers will strike someone with as varied and exotic a life as Tim’s as distinctly dull. Let’s see: 10 years ago, I…

From Ago

I did not sample a madeleine in tea yesterday, but I revisited a longtime friend whom Blogaria knows as Will Smama. We met in the fall of 1990, when she took one of the first classes I taught at Eckerd College. I was underprepared for beginning my life of teaching, as I’d been furiously typing…

Clarification and Emphasis

I’m reading a book just now that makes the repeated claim that the New Testament itself, the plain sense of the text, requires assent from its readers — and that provokes me to refine the point I was making yesterday. I don’t want to assert that any reader who picks up the New Testament and…

Told Them So

“Cardinal Urges Religious to Get Blogging” (thanks to Jeneane for the heads-up). In my “technology and religion” article, I addressed enither the ignorance that leads Cardinal Ruini to say, “I don’t understand the Internet, but especially young religious ought to enter blogs and correct the opinions of the youth” nor the “cult of professionals” rhetoric…

Commitment, Ambiguity, and Reading Scripture

I’m working on my paper for the annual Society of Anglican and Lutheran Theologians meeting, and for inspiration combing my back catalogue of quotations — my Commonplace Book. There I found the following quotation: Liberals believe that facts (of history, justice, science) are independent of the knower, and that it is the knower’s obligation to…

That’s Good News

Congratulations to Princeton Seminary, who have committed to a digital library initiative and have now arranged for a new XML content server for their digital collection. I had lunch with Nicole a month or so ago, and we enjoyed a great, wide-ranging conversation about knowledge, information, users, and libraries — if she’s excited about this…

Ngognog Ngogn

We are not at church. We volunteered to dogsit for some Princeton friends of ours, before we fully apprehended the consequences of that offer — namely, that the pug for whom we were caring is accustomed to sleeping with his owners, indeed, to burrowing into the bedclothes adjacent to them. And snoring. Add to that…

Judeans In the New Testament

I’ve been gratified to observe a small flurry of activity on the web recently, supporting a proposal I first made a long time ago: that we stand better to understand the New Testament and the history and politics surrounding it if we read the Greek word Ioudaios as “Judean” rather than “Jew.” A while ago,…

Getting Used To

The newest version of Quicksilver has changed the user interface, such that when I launch it and begin typing, I hesitate for a second — not recognizing what I see on the screen. Of course, Quicksilver interprets that pause as my changing my mind about what I want the application to do, so it redirects…

What He Said, Part Two

The much-[unfairly]-maligned Archbishop of Canterbury Rowan Williams interrogates Richard Dawkins’ version of the “Atheists Rule!” meme in an address transcribed here. And at the risk of self-promotion, I ought to remind readers that David Weinberger expressed his qualms about Dawkins a year ago.

Technology and Religion?

I was going to comment retrospectively on Tom’s post about the Bible and “proper” understanding, but Paul and Tom and Phil far outdid anything I’d be able to cobble together. So instead, I’ll summarize the article about technology and religion that I sent in to my editor. In the opening paragraphs, I try to sketch…

Deity and Delusion

I suppose there are theologians I respect more than Nicholas Lash, but there aren’t very many. So when I noticed that he had responded to The God Delusion in New Blackfriars, and that his response was among the free offerings in that otherwise walled-off journal, I turned to it with delight and great satisfaction. “A…