My Liturgical Bête Noire

I’m a man of strong liturgical positions, as you may have noticed, but the first among them, the thing that really chars my toast, that makes my blood boil, involves a modern [mis]representation of the eucharistic words of institution (the words that Jesus is reported to have said at the Last Supper, which the church…

Well, Maybe Kinda

A week or so ago, I was interviewed by C|Net’s Daniel Terdiman for a story about the new extension of World of Warcraft online game. I was very positively impressed by his careful attention to what I said, the points I thought I were worth highlighting. I got an email the other day from the…

Home Stretch

Today’s the second of two days devoted to Margaret’s dissertation topic, a reconsideration of the theology of hope in light of critical theory, nihilism, and Thomas Aquinas (it’s much more coherent than that sounds, but I’m hurrying). Tomorrow morning she’ll hand in this exam, and will be done until her oral defense on March 2.…

Further on Authenticity, Race, and Music

I’ve blogged before about the problems relative to un-nuanced judgments relative to race and music, most recently in relation to my search for the “Young Caucasians” clip from Saturday Night Live. At the time, I didn’t think to link this to Michelle Shocked’s long, tireless devotion to the problem of race and music. She’s spent…

Gospel

It is Reading Week at Seabury. Even with an all-day faculty meeting tomorrow, that is such a relief that I feel ten years younger (sadly, as Pippa would quickly remind me, that doesn’t enable me to feel as though I weigh what I did ten years ago, but I’m not complaining). The weather report indicates…

Sunday Morning and Saturday Night

This morning’s presentation in honor of Robert Brawley went well, I think; it was a shame that more people couldn’t have made it out to Bourbonnais, but the speakers made clear our admiration for Robert and his work. My observations on postmodernism as the context for Robert’s scholarship were well received, and the audience even…

Digital Seabury, Post Two

Earlier I suggested a selection of posts that pertain to the difference it would make for an institution of theological higher education to emigrate to digitally-indigenous teaching. Today’s blog from David Weinberger relative to his consulting visit to NPR (summarized by Jeff Jarvis, to whom I haven’t had a good excuse for linking in a…

No, Not Really

A certain member of the household — who shall go unnamed, except in the program of Oliver!, in which she’s playing the role of the Night Watchman and singing in the chorus — suggests that she found a source for me to get new vestments at a bargain price: “The model even looks like you,…

Three

This morning is Margaret’s third preliminary exam, the one on comparative literature and critical theory (she’s concentrating on nihilism). This is the last of the closed-room exams; after this one, she has a two-day take-home exam on her dissertation topic. Send a few supportive thoughts her way, give her spirit a boost as she churns…

Reviewing the Situation

Pippa’s starring in the chorus of the local homeschool production of Oliver!. OK, she’s in the chorus. But a couple of weeks ago, she was awarded the vital role of the Night Watchman. On that account she gets a line. It goes: “Murder! Murder!” I, being a diligent homeschool parent, have been working with her…

Those Who Don’t Remember

Tripp was querying me about history, historicism, texts, and ancient credulity. He called my attention to Paul Cantor’s article at the Claremont Review of Books — an article I found very impressive, though I applied the brakes at the sentence, “Historicists always stress the integrity of a culture and treat it as a seamless whole,…